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FAQs

How do students place into the Developmental Math Department?

Based upon the results of the Math portion of the basic skills assessment and placement test, a student may be placed in one of three entry level Math courses:

  • Basic Mathematics MAT-011
  • Accelerated Basic Mathematics MAT-012
  • Algebra for Liberal Arts MAT-040 or Algebra MAT-048

What is the purpose of the Developmental Mathematics Program?

The Developmental Mathematics Program provides the opportunity for the students to learn the skills needed to be successful in college level math. It helps the student improve important math concepts ranging from arithmetic to basic algebra.


Who administers the Developmental Math Program?

Students with questions about the Developmental Math Program should contact Professor Melanie Walker, Developmental Math Coordinator. She can be found in the Mathematics Department office, A-327.


Can students challenge their placement in the Developmental Math Program?

Students who think their placement test scores do not reflect their abilities are permitted to take a challenge test before registering for courses. Students placing into Basic Mathematics MAT-011 and Algebra for Liberal Arts MAT-040 or Algebra MAT-048 may challenge the elementary portion of the placement test after successful completion of the Basic Mathematics section and before registering for Algebra section.


What are the Entry level Math courses?

BASIC MATHEMATICS

The level one: Basic Arithmetic MAT-011AL (for students who achieve a score between 0 and 29 on the arithmetic section of the placement test); requires that students take 3 credit hours of Developmental Arithmetic and one credit hour of linked support MAT-011AL over one semester.

The level two: Basic Arithmetic MAT-011 (for students who achieve a score between 30 and 59 on the arithmetic section of the placement test); requires that students take 3 credit hours of Developmental Arithmetic over one semester.

The level three: MAT-012 (for students who achieve a score between 60 and 76 on the arithmetic section of the placement test); requires that students take 1 credit hour of Developmental Mathematics over a 7-week period.If completed within the 7-week period, the student may have the opportunity to register for Algebra during one of the Late Start semesters.

ALGEBRA

Algebra for Liberal Arts MAT-040 (for students who achieve a score between 0 and 75 on the Algebra section of the placement test and whose intended major does not require them to take Intermediate Algebra MAT-160); requires that students take 4 credit hours of Algebra for Liberal Arts MAT-040.

Algebra MAT-048 (also for students who achieve a score between 0 and 75 on the Algebra section of the placement test, but is for students whose intended major will require them to take Intermediate Algebra MAT-160, MAT-180 and/or beyond); requires that students take 5 credit hours of Algebra MAT-048 over one semester.


Do Developmental Math Department Courses count for college credit?

All courses offered by the Developmental Math Department award “non-degree” credits. This means that Developmental credits do not count in the total number of credits required for graduation. In most cases, these credits do not transfer to other colleges.


How do Developmental Math Courses affect a student’s GPA?

Developmental Math Courses are averaged into student’s cumulative grade point average. So good grades in any Developmental Course can help a student to get off to a good start in college.


What is the Annex?

The Annex is a support learning and testing center that allows students to drop in for tutoring and for additional time on task. The center, located in TEC 114A, is staffed by 2 full time supervisors and is open six days a week. Monday-Thursday 9-9, Friday 9-4, and Saturday 10-3.


What is the “T” computer section of Developmental Math? What is the computer-based Self-Paced Mastery Program?

T Section

A “T” section of Developmental Math identifies the self-paced computer-based Mastery Program, located in TEC 114 and TEC 117 (Technology Building).

Computer based Mastery Program

The computer based Mastery Program is a self-paced math course where students meet in a computer lab a certain amount of time each week with the same professor and a student tutor. Students watch videos related to each homework assignment, complete video notes related to each video, and achieve a level of mastery on each assignment. Students are able to work at their own pace and may retake tests to improve their score


What is the difference between a “Self-Paced” Class and a “Traditional” Class? What are the advantages of the “Self-Paced” Program?

The Self-paced Mastery program provides students with the opportunity to go through a course “at their own pace” instead of being controlled by the pace of the teacher in the traditional math lecture time. In the Self-paced computer labs staffed by Professors and professional and peer tutors, students work on computer-based activities. Students spend the bulk of their course time doing math problems rather than listening to a traditional math lecture.

Advantages of the Self-Paced computer program:

  • Accommodates different learning styles offering both videos and power points;
  • Offers on-demand individual assistance;
  • Provides immediate feedback on tests and homework;
  • Affords the opportunity to progress more quickly and complete two classes in one semester;
  • Enables the student to become an independent learner.


What do I do if all sections of a class are closed? How can I get into a class section that is closed?

Students are not permitted to register for closed sections.

Instructors do
not have the authority to sign students into closed classes. Students may visit the Departmental Secretary in A-325 to be placed on a waiting list. Once placed on a waiting list, students will only be notified if a new course section is opened. Otherwise it is the student’s responsibility to keep checking WebAdvisor for open seats.